Archives For KVM

The Cloonix development team recently released a major update to the Cloonix network simulator.

Cloonix version 28 makes major changes to the infrastructure of Cloonix. It changes the installation procedure, the location of Cloonix files on your computer, and the names of the commands used to start and administer Cloonix.

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Cloonix version 28 also makes changes to the features available to users. It adds support for multiple Cloonix servers running on the same machine, and standardizes and documents the new interface types used to connect virtual machines to each other.

Read the rest of this post for more details about what’s new in Cloonix v28.

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I need to determine the maximum number of KVM virtual machines that can run on an average laptop computer. Unfortunately, I cannot find authoritative information about the maximum number of KVM virtual machines that can run on a host computer. Most information I could find about KVM limits does not publish absolute limits but, instead, recommends best practices.

In this post, I will synthesize the information available from multiple sources into a single recommendation for the maximum number of KVM-based nodes that can run in an open-source network simulator running on a single host computer.

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In this post, I will show how to set up data capture in the GNS3 network simulator when using network devices that are emulated by VirtualBox or QEMU virtual machines.

The GNS3 network simulator makes it easy for users to capture and view data passing across the interfaces of devices running in a GNS3 network simulation. The GNS3 documentation covers how to capture data from devices running on Dynamips in GNS3 but the procedures for capturing data from devices running in other hypervisors, such as VirtualBox or QEMU/KVM, are not well documented.

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While GNS3 users may start and stop data capture on Dynamips VM interfaces any time they wish, they must plan ahead when they intend to capture data on open-source routers and hosts running on VirtualBox or QEMU virtual machines.

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Open-source DevOps tools are used to deploy applications and services in datacenter server networks, but they may also enable researchers or students to simulate networks. In this post, we will survey popular open-source DevOps tools and provide links to information that shows how to use them to create network simulation scenarios.

Most open-source network simulators simplify the setup and configuration of virtual machines and the networking connections between virtual machines. DevOps tools such as OpenStack do the same things, although they expose more of the complexities of the virtualized infrastructure to the user.

If you are already using DevOps tools for other activities you may find it useful to also use them when you need to create a simulated network instead of learning to use a network simulator.

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